CMOS Camera – P6: First Light

In July I finally got the UV/IR cut filter for this camera. I designed a simple filter rack and 3D printed it. The whole thing now fits together nicely in front of the sensor. IR cut is necessary due to a huge proportion of light pollution in the near-infrared spectrum.

Filter rack

UV/IR cut taped to the plastic rack.

With all the hardware in place, I added a single trigger exposure mode in the camera firmware. And accordingly a protocol command to issue a release on the PC software.

70SA

The camera is then attached to a SkyRover 70SA astrograph. In the camera angle adjuster, there’s a 12nm bandwidth Ha filter. This would allow me to easily reject light pollution while imaging in front of my house. Focusing through the Ha filter is extremely difficult. I chose a bright star and pulled the exposure time to maximum during liveview for focusing. Finally, before the battery pack went dry (supplying both AZ-EQ6 mount and my camera), I managed to obtain 15 frames with 5 minutes each.

NGC7000

No dark frame was used for the first light image and guiding performance was exceptional. This foiled the kappa sigma algorithm for hot pixel removal and makes the background very noisy. Anyway, NGC7000 already shows rich details!

Remarks

1. This sensor has higher dark current than Sony CMOS. Somewhat >4 folds more at the same temperature. However, doubling temperature is small. In another word, its dark current reduces quickly with cooling. Last time I observed no dark noise at –15C. Thus imaging the horsehead during winter would be brilliant here in Michigan!

2. Power issue. The sensor consumes ~110mA @5V during long integration comparing to ~400mA for continuous readout, which is minimal. However, the Zynq SoC + Ethernet PHY consumes much more than a full running CMOS sensor. Thus some power saving technique can be employed. CPU throttling during long integration/standby, powering down the fabric during standby mode, move the bulk of RTOS to OCM instead of using DDR, etc. But many of these require substantial work.

 

Anyway, I’m going to use this during the solar eclipse here in USA!

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2 Responses to CMOS Camera – P6: First Light

  1. Uğur says:

    Hi, can not I find the Nikon s9100 cmos sensor pin diagram for arduino

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