The Making of a Cooled CMOS Camera – P1

As my last post had suggested, I was working on a camera design. Right now the “prototype”, as I would call it, is in the test phase. The project actually dates back to 3 years ago when we envisioned a large focal area CCD imager customized for deep sky astrophotography. At that time, the price for such a commercialized camera was so prohibitive. The most suitable monochromatic chip was the interline KAL-11002 with a size of 36 x 24mm^2. Unlike full frame CCD which necessitates a mechanical shutter for exposure control, interline could handles this electronically. However, the addition of a shielded VCCD region greatly impacts the quantum efficiency and full well capacity. Beyond that, Kodak CCDs don’t seem to recover QE well enough with microlenses, with peak at 50% and only 30% for 650nm on a B/W device. Later on we started to dig deep into the datasheet and soon we abandoned the project. The accumulated dark current in VCCD was simply too much at the slow readout speed required for decent level of read noise.

KAL-11k

The KAL-11002ABA in the original plan

What happened next was dramatic. After getting my hands on D7000 and the hacking, I was shocked by how good CMOS sensor performs. I soon realized the era for CCD in astronomy might come to an end. Sooner or later, it will too embrace the noiseless CMOS in the telescopes. When Kodak span off its imaging division to Truesense, it soon re leased its first CMOS sensor with sub 4e- read noise and CCD-like dark current. We decided to give it a try.

KAC

Got the sensor, now big challenges lay ahead. To speed up, I decided to use the microZed SOM board as the embedded controller, at least for the prototype. Thus only the power supplies and connecting PCB had to be designed. The Zynq-7010 will configure the sensor with its SPI MIO from the ARM PS side. The data will be received at the FPGA programming logic (PL) and somehow relay to the PS DDR3 memory. The data can then undergo complex calibration and save to SD card or transfered over GbE/USB.

microZed

The microZed SOM with 1GB DDR3 and various I/O

The board is then designed and fabricated with the 754 CPU socket mounting the sensor. The main PCB contains the voltage regulators, oscillator and temperature sensing circuits.

Main_PCB

Stack-up

The data lines go through a relay board, which also provides power to Zynq PL I/O banks. The whole stack is then tripled checked before applying power. After weeks of hardware and software debugging, the sensor was finally configured and running at designated frame rate. Now it’s time to work on verilog in order to receive the data. I’m going to cover that in my next part.